The truth will not reveal itself.

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John G. Roberts, Jr.

On Tuesday, July 19, 2005, President Bush nominated John G. Roberts, Jr., to the Supreme Court. As part of its ongoing investigation into Bush’s federal court nominees, CIR has made Roberts’ 2003 financial disclosure statement and Senate confirmation questionnaire freely and easily accessible to the public on the Courting Influence web site. During Bush’s first […]

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Here Come the Judges, Again

The Senate, and increasingly the nation, are poised for a showdown in the coming days over President Bush’s blocked judicial nominees. CIR reporters Noyes and Isaacson reveal how seven key nominees to the federal appeals courts are the most visible examples of a trend toward judicial nominees with anti-government perspectives and close ties to corporate interests. […]

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Decline of the Empire

After years of access to the highest levels of state government, the California Correctional Peace Officers Association (CCPOA) has taken a blow to its power and prestige under Gov. Schwarzenegger. But, as it has done to many state senators, members of the State Assembly, and county district attorneys lacking sympathy for its agenda, the state’s […]

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Courting Influence

President George W. Bush’s nominees to some of the most influential positions on the federal bench during his first term are notable for their close ties to corporate interests, especially the energy and mining industries, according to a new investigation by the Center for Investigative Reporting. Many of the nominees have been appointed to judgeships […]

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Courting Big Business

Is the Bush White House using the courts as another way to pay back special interests? When President Bush nominated William G. Myers III for the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco in May 2003, judicial experience apparently wasn’t a factor in the choice. Myers has spent little time in the courtroom […]

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Also Turned Away

Forty-four states in the United States today bar people with mental illnesses from voting. Apart from laws affecting felons, these are the last overt voting restrictions on the books for citizens over 18. The exclusionary laws typically used in most states apply to those found to be “mentally incompetent” by the court and then placed […]

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Whose Vote Counts?

Millions of Americans are routinely stymied when attempting the most basic right of our democracy – casting a vote. In the radio documentary “Whose Vote Counts?,” CIR associate reporter Rebecca Perl investigates how citizens are legally denied or left out of the voting process. In an important election year, an estimated 10 million votes (or […]

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Clark Worked for Ark. Data Firm: Acxiom Role Part of Surveillance Debate

Retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark helped an Arkansas information company win a contract to assist development of an airline passenger screening system, one of the largest surveillance programs ever devised by the government. Starting just after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, Clark sought out dozens of government and industry officials on behalf of Acxiom […]